RAGONESE
KITCHEN  &  BATH
Milford, Massachusetts
PROUD TO BE KNOWN FOR QUALITY PRODUCTS, COMPETITIVE PRICING, AND PREMIUM QUALITY INSTALLATIONS
SINCE 1988
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WOOD SPECIES
NOTE: The following information is taken from the Omega specification
manual.  Most of this information would apply to any brand of cabinetry.

The unique beauty and elegance of hardwood is expressed in the Character
of each unique piece of hardwood as it is machined, joined and finished into
fine cabinetry.  If it is character, warmth and unique effects you prefer, then
traditional wood cabinetry from Omega Cabinetry should be your choice.
Just as no two trees are alike, no two pieces of wood are alike.  How and
where the tree grew can affect the frequency of mineral deposits, light and
dark wood, and grain patterns.  This natural process can result in variations
in grain and color throughout your cabinets.  Some species of wood have
more variation than others.  Please see the individual wood species
descriptions for more details.  Everyone benefits when the customer fully
understands the natural characteristics as outlined below.
Alder
Alder has a straight fine textured grain similar to Cherry and Maple.  Although classified as a hardwood, it is
moderately light in weight and considerably softer than the other species Omega offers.  Therefore, care must be
taken as it will dent and mar easily.  Alder has a fairly uniform honey color in its natural state.  Sapwood can be
distinguishable from the heartwood.  Tight pin knots are sometimes present.  It takes most finish colors well, even
into the mid to dark tone ranges without becoming mottled in appearance.

Cherry
Cherry is a smooth, even grained hardwood known for its warm, rich look.  Heartwood can range from deep red
to reddish-brown color.  In its natural state cherry may have areas that are yellowish, green, and even gray.  
Variations may be present in natural or light finished cabinets.  Cherry "mellows" and darkens with age; exposure
to bright or direct sunlight will cause the wood to darken and redden significantly.  Cherry will have some
sapwood, mineral streaking, fine pin holes and pitch pockets.  Most wood door styles are available in Cherry at an
upcharge of 10%.

Maple
Maple is characterized by its smooth, even, and fine grain pattern.  Natural Maple has some color variation, but is
generally more uniform than most hardwoods.  Mineral streaks are common in Maple and appear darker when
stained.  A distinct mottled or blotchy look is apparent when a stain is applied.  Most wood door styles are
available in maple at an upcharge of 8%.  When ordering opaque Maple 5-piece door (and/or drawer) styles, the
door's center panel will be constructed of MDF furniture material.  On opaque slab styles, the entire door and
drawer front will be constructed of MDF material.

Oak
Northern Red Oak is known for its predominant grain patterns that run from straight line to arched and pointed.  
Color and value (lightness or darkness) variations are present and noticeable in natural finishes.  Oak is one of the
stronger hardwoods.

Pecan
Pecan is one of the stronger hardwoods and is a member of the Hickory family.  Pecan is characterized by
dramatic color variations ranging from white sapwood to reddish-brown heartwood, even in the same piece of
wood.  Pecan will "mellow" with age making the color variation less apparent.  It will contain characteristics
associated with tree growth, which include pin holes, knots, burls, and color streaks.  Due to variations in wood,
some cabinet parts will have fewer characteristics than others.

Quartersawn Oak
Quartersawn White Oak is known for its distinctive "rays" and "flecks" in the wood grain.  White Oak is a slow
growing tree, therefore the growth rings are much closer together than in Red Oak.  Colors range from a nearly
white sapwood to a darker gray-brown heartwood.  Quartersawn Oak is cut using the heart of the wood as the
edge rather than the center, allowing  visibility of long radiated rays that create a rick fleck look.  Quartersawn
White Oak will take stain fairly evenly.  This hardwood is known for its strength, durability, and beauty.  White
oak is the best match when selecting moldings, etc. and has the same upcharge of 10%.

Red Birch
Red Birch is a strong, durable, closed grain wood with a very even texture.  In a natural finish the grain patterns
allow for an iridescent appearance.  This species looks similar to Cherry wood but doesn't darken dramatically as
it is exposed to sunlight.  Because Red Birch is the select heartwood from Yellow Birch trees, some sapwood of a
lighter color may be blended in the mix of boards.  Most wood door styles are available in Red Birch at an
upcharge of 20%.

Rustic Alder, Oak, Pecan
The Rustic variations of these woods have the same characteristics but feature more dramatic pin holes, knots,
knot holes, and grain variation.  Rustic doors and drawer fronts will have no less than 25% and possibly up to
50% of the rails and stiles with these more dramatic features.  These features are not available on plywood cabinet
sides, cabinet frames, moldings or accessories.  For Rustic sides, use recess/raised panel ends or door end kits.  
Rustic features add 5%.

NOTE - The natural characteristics of wood described above and variations in grain patterns and color are not
considered reasons for product replacement and are not covered under the limited warranty.